Kate DiCamillo

Kate DiCamillo

American writer
Date of Birth: 25.03.1964
Country: USA

Biography of Kate DiCamillo

Kate DiCamillo, an American writer, is known for her ability to write captivating stories for both children and adults. She has been successfully engaging young readers for the past 14 years, earning a place in the Golden Treasury of American Children's Literature.

Kate DiCamillo

Kate was born in Philadelphia and suffered from chronic pneumonia from an early age. When she was five years old, her family relocated to Clermont, Florida, in hopes that the warm climate would benefit her health. Accompanying Kate to Florida were her mother, a school teacher, and her brother Kurt DiCamillo, who would go on to become an accomplished architectural historian. Their father remained in Pennsylvania to sell his orthodontic practice and, unfortunately, never reunited with the family.

Kate DiCamillo

Kate studied English at the University of Florida and after graduating in 1987, she stayed and worked in Florida. At the age of 30, she moved to Minneapolis, where she took a job at a book warehouse. It was there that she developed the desire to become a writer, particularly for children. Soon after, Kate had the opportunity to meet with a representative from Candlewick Press. She presented the publisher with outlines of what would later become her book "Because of Winn-Dixie." This debut was highly successful, earning Kate the Josette Frank Award in 2000 and the Mark Twain Award in 2003. The book was also included in the "Best 100 Children's Books According to Teachers" by the National Education Association in 2007 and made it into the "School Library Journal" ranking in 2012.

Kate DiCamillo

Over time, Kate developed a distinct writing style. She wrote books for children of different ages and reading levels, and her stories almost always featured animal characters. In 2001, she published "The Tiger Rising," a story about a boy named Rob who discovers a caged tiger in the nearby woods. This book was as successful as her debut, even becoming a finalist for the National Book Award.

Kate DiCamillo

In 2003, Kate released "The Tale of Despereaux," inspired by a request from her friend's son, Luke Bailey. The boy asked Kate to write a book about an unusual hero with exceptionally large ears. This book went on to win the Newbery Award for outstanding contribution to American children's literature. "Because of Winn-Dixie" had also been a contender for this award, but unfortunately, it only received second place.

Three years later, Kate completed "The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane," a story about a rabbit who, after enduring numerous trials, transforms from a foolish and selfish creature into something more compassionate and capable of appreciating the love and care of others. This book won the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award for fiction in 2006.

In 2009, Kate published "The Magician's Elephant," and in 2013, she released her most recent work, "Flora & Ulysses: The Illuminated Adventures," which also received the Newbery Medal. In addition to her "classic" children's books, Kate is known for her series of books about Mercy Watson, a pig, which were beautifully illustrated by Chris Van Dusen.

"Because of Winn-Dixie" was adapted into a film by 20th Century Fox in 2005. Three years later, another one of Kate's books, "The Tale of Despereaux," was also made into a movie. Currently, two more adaptations of her popular books are in the works: "The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane" by New Line Cinema and "The Magician's Elephant" by 20th Century Fox, with a screenplay by Martina Hynes.

The idea for "Because of Winn-Dixie" came to Kate DiCamillo during the worst winter in Minnesota's history. She was suffering from the cold and loneliness but could not afford to return to her beloved Florida at that time. However, Kate found solace in writing a book that, in some way, brought her back to her cherished but temporarily distant home. Interestingly, this period was the first time Kate had to live without a dog, as her rental apartment did not allow pets. Once again, her imagination came to the rescue, and she created the perfect companion in her mind, helping to alleviate her loneliness.

© BIOGRAPHS