Konstantin Kizirov

Konstantin Kizirov

Sniper
Country: Ukraine

Content:
  1. Biography of Konstantin Kizirov
  2. Sniper on the Southern Front
  3. "Kaput, fascist!" exclaimed Kizirov. "The mission is accomplished."
  4. Excellence on the Dniester River
  5. "Where do you think he might be?" the sniper asked.
  6. "What a sniper, well done!" the platoon commander shouted.

Biography of Konstantin Kizirov

Konstantin Panastovich Kizirov was born in 1918 in the Zaporizhia region. Before the war, he served in the Red Army. He became a sniper and participated in the Great Patriotic War from the summer of 1942. He received his baptism of fire on the Southern Front and fought in the Battle of the Caucasus.

Kizirov distinguished himself during the summer of 1944 on the Dniester River and was awarded the Order of Glory III degree. From January 11th to 25th, 1945, he killed 15 fascists and was awarded the Order of Glory II degree. From March 28th to April 7th, 1945, Efreitor (corporal) Kizirov served in the 3rd Infantry Division of the Bulgarian Army, part of the 3rd Ukrainian Front, where he destroyed more than 50 fascists. He celebrated Victory Day in Austria.

Sniper on the Southern Front

Konstantin Kizirov began his military career in the summer of 1942 when the enemy was preparing to break through to Stalingrad and the Caucasus. As a member of the 25th Border Regiment, he arrived on the Southern Front. He faced heavy combat as the enemy's superior forces pushed them back to the Caucasian mountains. Private K. P. Kizirov became a sniper. He had learned the art of accurate shooting before the war while serving in the border troops. This skill proved invaluable when he had to defend his homeland with a weapon in his hands. Even during the retreat, Konstantin managed to take aim at enemy soldiers and officers. His comrades spoke highly of him, saying, "Our Kizirov has a sharp eye. If a fascist gets in the sights of his rifle, he won't escape." Konstantin described his profession as a sniper, saying, "A sniper, like a fisherman, must be patient, calm, and vigilant. That's when he's sure to have a 'catch.'"

In the mountains of the Caucasus, where the regiment held its defense, Kizirov often went on what his comrades jokingly referred to as a "hunt." He destroyed enemy snipers, observers, and machine gunners. He had thoroughly studied the habits of the Germans and skillfully took aim at them.

One day, a German sniper appeared in the area where the regiment was operating. He caused a lot of trouble, but they couldn't locate him. The regiment commander called Kizirov to his office.

"There's a difficult task, Kizirov," the officer said. "I've thought about it and realized that only you can solve it because of your experience. Before the war, you spent almost three years in the border troops. We need to eliminate the sniper who has been causing us a lot of problems for several days."

"I've heard about this sniper," Kizirov replied. "He must be elusive because he frequently changes his position. It will take time to track him down."

"You'll have the time," the commander agreed. "Start the mission today. The sooner you deal with the fascist, the better."

That evening, Kizirov was already in the front line with one of the platoons. He discussed the plan of action with the platoon commander. It was decided to dig a long trench in front of the trench, camouflage it well, and set up a position there. During the night, the sniper was supposed to make a dummy. At dawn, Kizirov and his partner were already at the combat post, which provided a good view of the enemy's front line. The front was relatively calm, with only sporadic exchanges of fire from both sides disrupting the morning silence. When the sun rose high enough to dissipate the misty haze in the valley, Kizirov ordered his assistant to briefly raise the dummy, wearing a helmet on its head. There was no reaction from the enemy. After some time, they repeated the trick, this time at the other end of the trench. As soon as the helmet appeared above the trench, a shot rang out from the enemy's side.

"So, this is where you've settled," Konstantin said. "Now I know your nest. Hold on, fascist!"

Kizirov focused on his scope and waited. Time passed slowly. The sniper started to worry if the enemy had changed his position. "Patience, patience again!" the soldier reminded himself.

Since the German had shot at the dummy, more than an hour had passed. Kizirov ordered his partner to show the decoy once again, this time at the opposite end of the trench. As soon as the helmet flickered above the trench, a shot rang out. Almost simultaneously, Konstantin fired his rifle.

"Kaput, fascist!" exclaimed Kizirov. "The mission is accomplished."

There were many such duels for the Soviet sniper. When the Soviet troops drove the German fascists from their land, Efreitor Kizirov was at the forefront of the offensive. The number of kills on his sniper rifle kept growing.

Excellence on the Dniester River

Kizirov particularly distinguished himself during the summer of 1944 on the Dniester River. Displaying courage and resourcefulness, he went "hunting" before the river crossing, targeting German soldiers on the right bank of the river. In a short time, he killed 25 enemy soldiers and officers, including two observers. For this feat, he was awarded the Order of Glory III degree.

When Soviet troops were engaged in combat outside their homeland, the border regiment was responsible for protecting the rear of their forces. However, Kizirov continued his "hunt" for the Fritz. In January 1945, he frequently appeared on the front line. The soldiers befriended the sniper and welcomed his presence in the trenches, providing him with any assistance he needed.

One morning, the Germans opened heavy artillery fire. It was clear that there was an observer who had a good view of the Soviet positions. At that moment, Kizirov arrived in the trench.

"We need you as much as air," the commander of the rifle platoon said to him. "Help us eliminate the fascist observer. They've been bombarding our trenches with shells for the past two days."

"Where do you think he might be?" the sniper asked.

They showed him a hill. Kizirov carefully examined it, took up a comfortable position, and aimed his experienced sniper rifle.

"Oh, wow!" Kizirov exclaimed. "A German officer is adjusting the fire."

Through his scope, he saw an officer with binoculars. He fired a shot, and the observer, who had been watching the hill through his binoculars, saw the German raise his hands and fall into the trench.

"What a sniper, well done!" the platoon commander shouted.

During his time on the front lines of the 60th regiment from January 11th to 25th, 1945, Kizirov killed 15 fascists, including the observing officer. When this was reported to the commander of the 57th Army, he awarded the border guard with the Order of Glory II degree.

From March 28th to April 7th, 1945, Efreitor Kizirov served with the 3rd Infantry Division of the Bulgarian Army, fighting against the Germans as part of the 3rd Ukrainian Front. The Bulgarian soldiers quickly became friends with the brave Soviet soldier. His courage, fearlessness, skill, and intense hatred of the fascists inspired the Bulgarians and made them want to emulate him.

Once, near the Drava River, a Bulgarian unit launched an attack on enemy positions. A powerful machine gun fire pinned down the platoon. Then, in front of the Bulgarian soldiers, a Soviet sniper advanced and took accurate shots, killing the machine gunners. The Bulgarian infantrymen launched their attack and captured the enemy position.

Kizirov spent less than two weeks in the Bulgarian division. During that time, he eliminated three fascist observers, more than ten soldiers, and a machine gun.

Sergeant Konstantin Kizirov celebrated Victory Day in Austria. There he learned that he had been awarded the Order of Glory I degree by the Decree of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR.

Konstantin Panastovich Kizirov accomplished many heroic deeds on the front lines. It was through the efforts of such Soviet soldiers that victory over the enemy was achieved.

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