Jungle Brothers

Jungle Brothers

American rap group
Country: USA

Biography of Jungle Brothers

The American rap group Jungle Brothers was founded in the late 1980s. They were fortunate enough to come together at a time when the hip-hop scene was still devoid of commercialism. Everywhere in the corners and trains of New York City, colorful graffiti adorned the walls, the work of street artists. B-boys performed in parks, and musicians freely showcased their talents to onlookers. Joining the hip-hop culture was as simple as winning a regular school talent show, which is exactly what two emerging rappers, Mike G (Michael Small) from Harlem and Afrika Baby Bambaataa (Nathaniel Hall) from Brooklyn, did. They attended the same school in Manhattan and often threw noisy parties in their respective neighborhoods. Soon, they were joined by their friend from Harlem, Sammy Baka Sweet Daddy (Sammy Burwell). With the help of Mike's uncle, DJ Red Alert, a well-known club DJ in New York and host on the famous radio station "KISS FM," the group gained experience performing professionally in clubs and on the radio. The group recorded their first demo at DJ Red Alert's studio, based on which they signed a contract with the disco label "Warlock/Idler Records". With DJ Red Alert's support, the group released their debut album "Straight Out Of Jungle" - a work distinguished by its meaningful content, intelligence, and funk roots. The leading role of the so-called "fusion rap" (rap mixed with other styles) became even more noticeable in their second album, "Done By The Forces Of Nature," which was released on "Warner Brothers" after a year-long touring hiatus. The Jungle Brothers didn't need to flaunt thick gold chains or wear Adidas tracksuits to assert their uniqueness. The last one was eloquently evidenced by their sharp humor (mostly on sexual themes), national positivity, and insightful social commentary about the place of black people in a system dominated by "white" genes and values. The group didn't consider commercial success as their main goal, which allowed its members to freely experiment without catering to public taste. Their next album, initially titled "Crazy Wisdom Masters," turned out to be so experimental in its sound that "Warner" was hesitant to release it. Disputes about its "acceptability" took years. The group was persuaded to make numerous revisions and incorporate trendy gangsta sounds. Finally, in 1993, the album titled "J. Beez Wit The Remedy" was released. "Warner's" marketing miscalculation pushed the group to the brink of dissolution. Jungle Brothers members pursued their individual endeavors for a while: Mike started a company producing t-shirts with various symbols, Afrika composed music for the soundtrack of "Jason's Lyric," and Sammy worked as a bodyguard. "If it weren't for our long-standing friendship, if we were only doing music for money," says Mike, "we would have just gone our separate ways." In 1997, the group reunited to continue creating dance music. Some of their new works, such as "V.I.P.," became very popular on dance floors across Europe.

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