Mark Ulpiy Trayan

Mark Ulpiy Trayan

Roman Emperor
Date of Birth: 15.09.0195
Country: Italy

Biography of Marcus Ulpius Trajanus

Marcus Ulpius Trajanus, a Roman emperor, died on August 8, 117 AD. He was regarded by the inhabitants of the Italian peninsula as the most just and one of the greatest rulers. Trajan was indeed a highly respected figure. As the first Roman emperor to be born outside of Rome, in the province (some say his father was a governor in Iberia, present-day Spain, while others claim that the future emperor's parent governed Syria), Trajan proved to be an extremely active monarch. His greatest achievement is considered to be the conquest of vast and wealthy Dacia, an area in present-day Romania, inhabited by the warlike Dacian tribes who had remained unconquered by anyone until Trajan. The conquest of this territory meant significant enrichment for Rome, as the Dacians possessed abundant amounts of gold, which flowed into the Roman treasury. Among Trajan's other external conquests, it is worth noting the defeat of the enormous Parthian Empire and the annexation of Armenia and Mesopotamia to the Roman Empire. The Nabataean Kingdom was transformed by Trajan into the Roman province of Arabia, and to this day, the territory has not changed its name. The Romans loved Trajan so much for all these conquests, which brought the Roman Empire to the height of its power, that they erected numerous monuments in his honor, including triumphal arches and Trajan's Column. This column, by the way, is still considered one of the main architectural landmarks of Rome. The 33-meter-high structure is surrounded by reliefs depicting Trajan's major battles. However, there is a fly in the ointment. Trajan is considered one of the main persecutors of Christians, as it was he who introduced the principle of "renounce or die," which most Roman rulers subsequently followed regarding Christians. Therefore, followers of Christianity have always had a somewhat cautious attitude towards Trajan, until Pope Gregory the Great obtained forgiveness for him. It is said that once, while passing by Trajan's Column, the pontiff, in his own words, "was wounded in his heart" by the thought that the most just of rulers was suffering in hell. Gregory engaged in intense prayer to seek forgiveness for Trajan and was eventually informed by an angel that his prayers had been answered - Trajan, a pagan and persecutor of Christians, had found salvation. However, Trajan's contemporaries did not need any revelations about his salvation to consider their emperor as the epitome of justice and mercy. He confirmed their opinion with every action he took. For example, it is said that once, when heading to the campaign in Dacia, Trajan was stopped by a woman who complained about the unjust conviction of her son. The emperor dismounted his horse, personally accompanied the woman to court, and only when the case was resolved in her favor did the campaign continue. How could one not love such a benefactor of the people? Moreover, Trajan was beloved even beyond the borders of the Roman Empire. The famous phrase in "The Lay of Igor's Campaign" - "the centuries of Trajan," refers to the golden age of the Russian lands.

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