Vanga

Vanga

Bulgarian fortune teller
Date of Birth: 31.01.1911
Country: Bulgaria

Content:
  1. Biography of Vanga
  2. Public Attention
  3. Prophecies

Biography of Vanga

Vanga was a Bulgarian woman who was believed to have the gift of clairvoyance. She was born on January 31, 1911, in Strumica, in what is now the Republic of Macedonia. Her name, Vangelia, means "good news" in Greek. Vanga grew up in a poor Bulgarian peasant family and spent most of her life in the city of Petrich, near the borders of three countries.

 Vanga

At the start of World War I, Vanga's father, Pande, was mobilized into the Bulgarian army. Her mother died when she was four years old, and she was raised by a neighbor. After the war, Vanga's widowed father remarried, and in 1923, when she was 12 years old, she moved with her father and stepmother to the village of Novo Selo in Macedonia, where her father was originally from.

 Vanga

It was in Novo Selo that Vanga lost her sight at the age of 12 during a hurricane. She was found in the evening with her eyes filled with sand after being thrown several meters by a whirlwind. Her family was unable to afford treatment, and as a result, Vanga became blind. In 1925, she was sent to a home for the blind in Zemun, Serbia, where she stayed for three years. After the death of her stepmother, she returned to her father's home in Strumica.

 Vanga

Public Attention

Vanga first gained public attention during World War II when rumors spread that she had the ability to locate missing people from the war, whether they were alive or dead, and identify the locations where they were buried. One of Vanga's first distinguished visitors was King Boris III of Bulgaria, who visited her on April 8, 1942. In May 1942, Vanga married Dimitar Gushterov from the village of Kruandzhilitsa in the Petrich region. Shortly before their wedding, she moved with her husband to Petrich, where she later became widely known.

 Vanga

According to her followers, Vanga had the ability to accurately diagnose people's illnesses and predict their future. She often referred them to healers or doctors who could help them, sometimes without even knowing them, simply by saying, "There is a person in this city who can help you." In 1967, Vanga became a state employee, receiving an official salary of 200 leva per month. Visiting her cost 100 leva for citizens of socialist countries and 50 dollars for citizens of "Western" countries. Before this, Vanga saw people for free, accepting various gifts in return.

 Vanga

Prophecies

There are reports that Vanga predicted the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Chernobyl disaster, Boris Yeltsin's victory in the 1996 presidential elections, the sinking of the Russian submarine Kursk, the September 11 attacks, and the victory of Veselin Topalov in the World Chess Championship. In 1979, Vanga said, "But old Russia will return and will be called the same as during the time of Saint Sergius." In early 1993, she predicted that the USSR would be reborn in the first quarter of the 21st century, with Bulgaria being part of it. She also predicted the birth of many new people in Russia who would be able to change the world.

In 1994, Vanga predicted, "At the beginning of the 21st century, humanity will be rid of cancer. There will come a day when cancer will be shackled in 'iron chains.'" She explained that the cure for cancer would contain a lot of iron. She also believed that a cure for aging would be developed using hormones from horses, dogs, and turtles, saying, "The horse is strong, the dog is enduring, and the turtle lives a long time."

Before her death, Vanga said, "There will come a time of wonders and great discoveries in the field of the non-material. There will be great archaeological discoveries that will change our understanding of the world since ancient times. It is predetermined." She passed away in 1996 from breast cancer, refusing to undergo surgery. Vanga expressed her desire to be buried in the yard of her home, but the Vanga Foundation decided to bury her near the St. Petka Church.

On May 5, 2008, a museum dedicated to Vanga was opened in her home in Petrich.

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