Dorothy Tutin

Dorothy Tutin

English stage, film and television actress
Date of Birth: 08.04.1930
Country: Great Britain

Content:
  1. Biography of Dorothy Tutin
  2. Early Career
  3. Notable Theatrical Roles
  4. Success in Film and Television
  5. Personal Life and Legacy

Biography of Dorothy Tutin

Dorothy Tutin was an English stage, film, and television actress. She was awarded the title of Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 2000, after previously receiving the title of Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in 1967. Tutin was born on April 8, 1930, in London, England. She was the daughter of John Tutin and his wife, Adie Evelyn Fryers. She received her education at St Catherine's School in Bramley, Surrey, and studied performing arts at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art.

Dorothy Tutin

Early Career

Despite being a talented pianist, Tutin ultimately chose to pursue acting, believing that it was her true calling. She made her first appearance on the theatrical stage on September 6, 1949, playing the English princess Margaret in William Douglas-Home's play "The Thistle and the Rose." In January 1950, she joined the Bristol Old Vic Company, performing in plays such as "As You Like It," "Captain Carvallo," and "The Provok'd Wife." During the London theater season from 1950 to 1951, Tutin participated in plays such as Ben Jonson's "Bartholomew Fair," "The Merry Wives of Windsor," and "Henry V." She played the role of Martina in Christopher Fry's play "Thor With Angels" at the Lyric Hammersmith in September 1951. In January 1952, she joined the cast of John Gielgud's successful comedy production "Much Ado About Nothing" at the Phoenix Theatre.

Dorothy Tutin

Notable Theatrical Roles

Some of Tutin's other notable theatrical roles include Lady Macbeth in Shakespeare's tragedy "Macbeth" at the Yvonne Arnaud Theatre in October 1976, Cleopatra in another Shakespearean tragedy "Antony and Cleopatra," which was included in the Edinburgh Festival program in 1977, and Doris in the production of "The Gin Game" in 1999, alongside Joss Ackland.

Dorothy Tutin

Success in Film and Television

Thanks to her unique appearance and, of course, her acting talent, Tutin quickly found success in film and television. She received the role of Cecily Cardew in Anthony Asquith's comedy-drama "The Importance of Being Earnest," which earned her a nomination for the Most Promising Newcomer award at the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA). In 1953, Tutin played Polly Peachum in the musical film "The Beggar's Opera." In 1958, she earned a notable role as Lucie Manette in Ralph Thomas's melodrama "A Tale of Two Cities," alongside Dirk Bogarde.

Dorothy Tutin

Personal Life and Legacy

Tutin married actor Derek Waring, and they had two children, Nicholas and Amanda, who both followed in their parents' footsteps and became actors. Derek and Dorothy remained married until her death from leukemia in 2001. Waring passed away in 2007. An obituary in "The Daily Telegraph" described Tutin as "one of the most charming, educated, and intellectual ladies of the post-war British stage. With her husky voice, deep brown eyes, sad smile, and sense of humor, she brought timeless charm to every aspect of the performing arts – from ancient to modern, and in films and television plays."

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