Frank Wright

Frank Wright

American architect, founder of the so-called. "organic architecture"
Date of Birth: 08.06.1867
Country: USA

Biography of Frank Wright

Frank Lloyd Wright, an American architect and founder of the "organic architecture" movement, was a renowned architect, interior designer, writer, and educator. Throughout his long life and career, Wright designed over a thousand buildings and constructed 532 of them. His most notable contribution to architecture was the fusion of architecture and philosophy, which became known as "organic architecture". This concept emphasizes the harmony between buildings, nature, and the people who use them. Although the concept was originally introduced by the American architect Louis Sullivan, it became well-known and popular thanks to Frank Wright, who also coined the term.

Frank Wright

One of the most picturesque examples of his work is the "Fallingwater", a country residence for the Kaufman family completed in 1935. It is not only considered a significant masterpiece of American architecture but also the most famous residential home of all time. Wright was a leader and driving force behind the Prairie School, an architectural movement characterized by buildings with horizontal lines that evoke the vastness of the Great Plains. He later developed the concept of the Usonian house, a compact and technologically advanced design that influenced the development of American suburbs for decades.

Frank Wright

Wright's projects encompassed a wide range of building types, including offices, churches, schools, skyscrapers, hotels, and museums, such as the renowned Guggenheim Museum in New York City, which is shaped like a spiral. In addition to construction, Wright also designed many interior elements of his buildings, including furniture and stained glass. He wrote 20 books, published numerous articles, and was a popular lecturer in the United States and Europe. His colorful personal life often made headlines, including the tragic events of 1914 when a worker killed his mistress, her two children, and several others at Taliesin, Wright's countryside estate, before setting it on fire. Wright was not present at the time as he was in Chicago.

Frank Wright

Despite his accomplishments, Frank Wright did not have a formal education. Although he attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison, he dropped out after a year and never obtained a degree (except for an honorary doctorate in 1955). In 1886, he began working as a draftsman for Joseph Lyman Silsbee, an architectural firm in Chicago. After gaining experience, Wright joined Louis Sullivan's firm in 1888, where he worked for five years and developed his distinctive style. It was this style that ultimately led to his dismissal, as his extravagant lifestyle led him into debt. To repay his debts, Wright designed and built several houses privately without informing Sullivan. When Sullivan discovered Wright's work in a house near his own, he felt insulted and fired the young architect, who saw it as an opportunity to start his own company.

The peak of Wright's fame came during the first half of the 20th century. He experienced periods of success as well as periods of obscurity. However, when he passed away on April 9, 1959, America mourned the loss of its most exceptional architect. In 1991, the American Institute of Architects recognized Frank Lloyd Wright as the "greatest American architect of all time."

© BIOGRAPHS