Gay Kvint

Gay Kvint

Roman Emperor in 249-251.
Country: Italy

Biography of Gaius Messius Quintus

Gaius Messius Quintus was a Roman emperor from 249 to 251 AD. He was born in 195 AD and died in 251 AD. Quintus was born in Sirmium, Pannonia. He climbed the ranks of the military and in 249 AD, he was sent to Moesia by Emperor Philip to calm the rebellious legions. However, the soldiers declared Quintus as the emperor himself (Gibbon: 10). He went against Philip and defeated him in Verona. Philip was killed, and Quintus seized supreme power (Victor: "On the Caesars"; 29). According to Victor, Quintus possessed diverse knowledge and many virtues. In peaceful conditions, he was gentle and sociable, but in war, he was highly energetic. In 250 AD, Quintus and his co-emperor son led an expedition to Moesia to repel the invasion of the Gothic hordes (Victor: "On the Lives and Customs of Roman Emperors"; 29). This was the first major clash between the Romans and this restless people. Quintus forced the Goths to lift the siege on Nicopolis, but when the Romans wanted to pursue the enemy, the Goths suddenly turned around and attacked them. Quintus retreated in disorder behind the Balkans, and the Goths captured another major city, Philippopolis (Jordan: 102-103). In Macedonia, they declared Lucius Priscus as the emperor, but when Quintus rapidly moved against him, power in Rome was seized by Julius Valens. At the same time, in Syria, Iotapian declared himself emperor. However, they were all soon killed (Victor: "On the Lives and Customs of Roman Emperors"; 29). Taking advantage of the delay of the Goths near Philippopolis, Quintus was able to regroup his forces. The following year, he attacked them near Abrittus. At the beginning of the battle, his son, a promising young man who had already been admitted to share in the imperial power, was killed before his eyes by an arrow. Quintus, without losing his composure, declared that the loss of one soldier did not matter for the republic (Jordan: 103). After this, a fierce and intense battle ensued. Initially, the Goths retreated under the pressure of the Romans. But when the fighting moved to a swamp, the Romans were unable to withstand them. They were surrounded and defeated. Quintus himself drowned in the swamp along with his horse, and even his body was not found (Gibbon: 10).

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