George Romero

George Romero

American director, actor, screenwriter, editor
Date of Birth: 04.02.1940
Country: USA

Biography of George A. Romero

George Andrew Romero was an American director, actor, screenwriter, and editor. He was born in New York in 1940, to a family with Cuban relatives on his father's side and Lithuanian relatives on his mother's side. Fascinated by filmmaking from an early age, George enrolled at the University of Pittsburgh, where he continued to make short films while studying.

George Romero

In 1968, Romero directed his first feature film, "Night of the Living Dead." He funded the film with money earned from his company, "Image Ten Productions," which he started with friends. This black and white film revolutionized the genre, ushering in the era of zombies. Interestingly, Romero initially planned to make a comedy titled "Monsters" but ended up creating a horror film instead. Despite facing harsh criticism and attempts to ban the movie, "Night of the Living Dead" became a huge success, establishing Romero as a classic filmmaker.

George Romero

In the following years, Romero directed several films, including "There's Always Vanilla" (1971), "Hungry Wives" (1972), and "The Crazies" (1973). In 1978, he returned to the zombie theme with "Dawn of the Dead." This terrifying nightmare, which began with "Night of the Living Dead," continued to captivate audiences. Romero went on to direct "Day of the Dead," "Diary of the Dead," and "Survival of the Dead," solidifying his reputation as a master of the zombie genre.

George Romero

"Dawn of the Dead" was Romero's first big-budget film and paved the way for him to make more expensive productions. The movie earned around $40 million at the box office, proving the demand for such genre films and establishing Romero as a high-caliber director. In 1988, he released "Monkey Shines," which featured a higher number of deaths occurring off-screen, deviating slightly from Romero's usual style of showcasing gruesome scenes.

George Romero

In 1990, Romero collaborated with Italian director Dario Argento on "Two Evil Eyes," an adaptation of two Edgar Allan Poe stories. Romero directed the zombie-themed segment, while Argento directed the other. In 1993, Romero directed "The Dark Half," a thriller exploring the dark depths of the subconscious mind.

In 2000, Romero's thriller "Bruiser" received a lukewarm reception. This setback may have hindered his opportunity to become the creator of the "Resident Evil" franchise, as he had been working on a script for the film at the time. However, in 2005, Romero released "Land of the Dead," which became another hit.

Romero often avoided commenting on the social subtext of his films, continuing to focus on making zombie movies. It is worth noting that he disliked using the term "zombie" and associated his terrifying characters with a transformation rather than soulless killing machines.

In addition to his work behind the camera, Romero occasionally appeared as an actor, often in his own "of the Dead" series. He also had a small role in Jonathan Demme's acclaimed film "The Silence of the Lambs," although he went uncredited.

During the filming of one of his horror films, Romero met his future wife, actress Christine Forrest. They got married in 1981 and had two children together.

In 2010, Romero worked as a screenwriter for the thriller "The Crazies," directed by Breck Eisner. Romero authored five books in the horror genre, further showcasing his talent and passion for the genre.

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