Wolfman Jack

Wolfman Jack

American DJ
Date of Birth: 21.01.1938
Country: USA

The Biography of Wolfman Jack

Wolfman Jack was an American DJ who gained widespread popularity in the 1960s and 1970s. He was known for his unique, raspy voice. Robert Smith Weston was born on January 21, 1938, in Brooklyn, New York, and was the second child in his family. His parents divorced when he was a child. To keep Robert away from the streets and trouble, his father bought him a powerful radio receiver, and Robert became a passionate fan of rhythm and blues and DJs. One of his childhood idols, John R. Richbourg from Nashville, later became his mentor.

 Wolfman Jack

After school, Robert worked as a door-to-door salesman, selling encyclopedias and patented brushes. He then enrolled in the National Academy of Broadcasting in Washington, D.C. In 1960, he graduated from the academy and became a DJ at a radio station in Newport News, Virginia, using the pseudonym Daddy Jules. He later moved to Shreveport, Louisiana in 1962, where he worked as a morning DJ for a country music radio station.

 Wolfman Jack

In 1961, Robert married Lucy 'Lou' Lamb, whom he always called Lou, and they had two children, daughter Joy Rene Smith and son Tod Weston Smith. Inspired by DJ Alan Freed, also known as Moon Dog, who started each show with a howling dog sound effect, Robert came up with his stage name and developed his own signature sound effects for his radio shows.

 Wolfman Jack

In 1963, Robert was hired by advertising agency Ramon Bosquez, who sent him to a radio station in Ciudad Acuña, Mexico. The station had an extremely powerful signal that reached almost the entire United States. It was on XERF that Smith developed some of his signature phrases and gained widespread popularity.

Wolfman Jack advertised various products, including dog food, weight loss pills, muscle gain supplements, potency pills, roses, and chicken meat. Eventually, he moved to Los Angeles. At the peak of his career, Wolfman Jack could be heard on over 2000 radio stations in 53 countries, and his ratings were sky high.

In 1989, he relocated to North Carolina. From 1973 to 1992, Smith became a public figure and appeared in 18 films and TV shows. Robert Smith Weston passed away on July 1, 1995, from a heart attack at his home in Belvidere, North Carolina. The day before his death, Wolfman Jack hosted his final live broadcast, a weekly program from the Planet Hollywood restaurant in Washington, D.C. At the end of the show, he said, "I can't wait to go home and embrace Lou, as I've done for many years." He died almost instantly after returning home from a promotional tour for his autobiography, "Have Mercy, The Confession of the Original Party Animal," which detailed his early career and celebrity parties. He collapsed on the floor after hugging his wife and said, "It feels good to be home." Wolfman Jack died in his wife's arms.

In 1996, he was posthumously inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame. Many TV shows, music bands, and performers paid tribute to his popularity with unique parodies of Wolfman Jack's performances. Even the children's program "Sesame Street" released a rock song compilation, hosted by an anthropomorphic pink wolf wearing sunglasses named "Jackman Wolf."

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