Ferdinand Berthier

Ferdinand Berthier

French deaf educator and activist
Date of Birth: 28.09.1803
Country: France

Content:
  1. Biography of Ferdinand Berthier
  2. Education and Influences
  3. Teaching and Advocacy
  4. Legacy and Works

Biography of Ferdinand Berthier

Ferdinand Berthier was a French deaf educator and activist who was born in 1803 in Louhans, Saône-et-Loire, France. At the age of 8, Ferdinand became a student at the famous Institute for the Deaf in Paris (Institut National de Jeunes Sourds de Paris), which was directed by the renowned educator and innovator Abbé Roch-Ambroise Sicard.

Education and Influences

Ferdinand traveled a long way from the southeast of France to attend the school, dreaming of receiving an education and acquiring a profession despite his deafness. He was greatly influenced by his great teacher Abbé Bébian, a hearing individual who had studied sign language and made significant efforts in developing teaching methods and publishing textbooks for the deaf around the world. Ferdinand was also deeply impressed by two other prominent figures at the school, Jean Massieu and Laurent Clerc.

Teaching and Advocacy

Later, at the age of 27, Ferdinand himself became a professor at his school. In late 1837, he approached the French government with a request to establish the "Société Centrale des Sourds-muets" - the Central Society for the Deaf and Mute. Permission was granted, and a year later, the first society of its kind in the world began its work in advocating for the interests of the deaf. Ferdinand Berthier became its first leader.

One of the organization's goals was to bring together deaf individuals from around the world and promote the adoption of a universal sign language. Ferdinand Berthier was a passionate advocate for a unified language. He also authored several research works on the history and culture of deaf people, writing biographies of deaf artists, poets, and other notable figures with hearing impairments. Notably, he wrote a biographical work about his beloved teacher Bébian, whom he admired greatly. Additionally, he wrote about the other professors at the Institute for the Deaf, although he did not hesitate to criticize them.

Legacy and Works

Ferdinand Berthier's most notable work is "Forging Deaf Education in Nineteenth-Century France," which focuses on the individuals who had the strongest influence on him. He dedicated his life to the education and advocacy of the deaf, leaving a lasting legacy in the field of deaf education and the promotion of sign language.

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