Hamilton Camp

Hamilton Camp

American singer-songwriter and actor
Date of Birth: 30.10.1934
Country: USA

Content:
  1. Biography of Hamilton Camp
  2. Musical Career
  3. Acting Career
  4. Voice Acting and Personal Life

Biography of Hamilton Camp

Hamilton Camp was an American singer-songwriter and actor known for his work both on and off screen. He was born in London, England, on October 30, 1934. During World War II, he and his mother and sister were evacuated to the United States. Hamilton became a child actor, appearing in films and working on the theatrical stage. Initially, he performed under the name Bob Camp, but later changed it to Hamilton when he discovered the religious movement 'Subud', which advocated for the 'Great Power of Life' that could supposedly guide a person to the true path. For several years, he referred to himself as Hamid Hamilton Camp and even led the group 'Skymonters', which released an album on the American record label 'Elektra' in 1973.

Hamilton Camp

Musical Career

As a folk singer, Camp made his debut at the Newport Folk Festival in 1960. He recorded his first album with Bob Gibson as part of the project 'Gibson & Camp at the Gate of Horn'. For forty years, Hamilton built a dual career in both the music and film industries. While he appeared in over a hundred films, he became most famous as the songwriter of 'Pride of Man', which was performed by several artists, including the psychedelic rock group 'Quicksilver Messenger Service' and Gordon Lightfoot. Camp and Gibson also co-wrote the gospel song 'You Can Tell the World', which reached the top of the track list on the first album of the duo 'Simon & Garfunkel' titled 'Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M.'. Additionally, Hamilton performed the song 'Here's to You', which had moderate success and reached number 68 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1968.

Hamilton Camp

Acting Career

In addition to his musical pursuits, Camp lent his voice to various projects, including voicing a robot police officer in the science fiction film 'Starchaser: The Legend of Orin' in 1985. He worked with the comedy troupe 'The Committee' in San Francisco and appeared multiple times on the theatrical stage, including a role in the play 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' performed at the modern amphitheater 'Hollywood Bowl' in 2004. On television, Hamilton played a young messenger in the 1953 film 'Titanic' and had a supporting role in the sitcom 'He & She'. As a guest star, Camp appeared in episodes of popular series such as 'M*A*S*H', 'The Mary Tyler Moore Show', 'The Twilight Zone', 'Starsky & Hutch', 'The Andy Griffith Show', 'Bewitched', and portrayed an elderly H.G. Wells in the television series 'Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman' starring Dean Cain and Teri Hatcher. He appeared as Leck in the science fiction hit series 'Star Trek: Deep Space Nine' and played a cargo ship pilot in another installment of the franchise, 'Star Trek: Voyager'. Unfortunately, three series – 'Turn-On', 'Co-Ed Fever', and 'McGurk: A Dog's Life' – were canceled after shooting only one episode, despite Camp's intended involvement as a regular cast member. In the first season of the series 'WKRP in Cincinnati', the actor played Del Murdock in the fifth episode and also landed the role of Arthur Waybright in the sitcom 'Too Close for Comfort'.

Hamilton Camp

Voice Acting and Personal Life

Camp was also known to a younger audience as the voice of Fenton Crackshell (Gizmoduck, also known as Techoduck or Superduck) in the Disney animated series 'DuckTales'. Additionally, Hamilton portrayed an older Malcolm Corley in the video game 'Full Throttle', provided the voice for Count Dracula in the animated film 'Scooby-Doo and the Reluctant Werewolf', and replaced the late Karl Swenson, who had long voiced Disney's Merlin. Hamilton was married from 1961 to 2002 and became a widower. His wife gave him six children, who in turn made him a grandfather to thirteen grandchildren. At the age of 70, Camp suddenly died of a myocardial infarction on October 2, 2005. His body was cremated.

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