Oswald Mosley

Oswald Mosley

Founder of the British Union of Fascists
Date of Birth: 16.11.1896
Country: Great Britain

Biography of Oswald Mosley

Oswald Mosley, the founder of the British Union of Fascists, had a promising political career due to his background and certain talents. Unfortunately, Mosley chose a platform that did not garner much success – as the founder of the British Union of Fascists, he never gained the love of the people, especially after the start of World War II.

Oswald Mosley

Mosley was the eldest of three children born to Oswald Mosley and his wife Katharine Maud Edwards-Heathcote. After his parents' divorce, he was raised by his mother and paternal grandfather. On May 11, 1920, Mosley married Cynthia Curzon, the second daughter of Lord George Curzon. In 1933, Cynthia passed away from peritonitis, and Mosley later remarried his mistress, Diana Guinness, in a secret ceremony held at Joseph Goebbels' house. Adolf Hitler was known to be one of the guests at the wedding. Mosley had three children from his first marriage and two from his second.

Oswald Mosley

Mosley spent some time in military academy but was expelled due to a conflict with another student. During World War I, he served as an observer in the Royal Air Force, but his attempt to impress his sister and mother resulted in a plane crash and permanent lameness. Mosley tried to return to active duty but it became clear that his injury prevented him from becoming a soldier. He spent the rest of the war in the headquarters.

Oswald Mosley

Towards the end of World War I, Mosley decided to enter politics as a member of the Conservative Party, partly because he lacked higher education and practical skills due to the war. It took him some time to define his platform. Initially, his main goal was to prevent future wars. Mosley quickly gained recognition as a skilled politician and an exceptionally talented speaker. However, his platform went through constant changes: after falling out with the Conservatives, he joined the Labour Party. When he became disillusioned with Labour, he swiftly established the New Party. Although the party had increasingly fascist tendencies, it failed to achieve significant success, partly because of Mosley's indecisiveness and inactivity.

After the New Party's initial failure, Mosley studied the experiences of other countries, particularly the activities of Benito Mussolini. Inspired by what he learned, Mosley decided to unite all local fascists and created the British Union of Fascists. This organization was openly anti-communist, fiercely nationalist, and protectionist. The party had around 50,000 members, and for a while, it was supported by the "Daily Mail" and "Daily Mirror" newspapers. Mosley attempted to organize several high-profile public actions, which achieved some success. However, the outbreak of war turned the public strongly against fascists.

In mid-May 1940, an assassination attempt was made on Mosley, and he and other active members of the party were later interned. In November 1943, his punishment was reduced to house arrest. By the end of the war, Mosley's political reputation was severely damaged. After the war, former supporters urged him to return to politics. Initially, he tried to succeed in trade unionism and later within the framework of the National Party of Europe. In 1951, Mosley moved to Ireland and later found refuge in Paris. Although he returned to Britain for the 1959 elections, he did not achieve significant success.

On December 3, 1980, Oswald Mosley passed away in his home. He was cremated in Paris, and his ashes were scattered over a nearby pond.

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